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The Spirit of Esau

1. Esau was typology of an attitudinal disposition that God hates.

He was a real-life illustration. Don’t ask me why God chooses to use a whole human being as an analogy. Please, I don’t know.

2. The spirit of Esau typifies an individual who has no value for and organized and urbane lifestyle.

3. He negated and despised what his family inheritance was, that was readily available, to chase after a fleeting probabilistic delicacy—bush meat.

His father had lots of animals at home, but he chose to be a hunter. Many men have beautiful and loyal wives at home, but they prefer street girls. What future did Esau have with bush meat? Could he have made wealth from bush meat?

4. Esau is that race, persons, or individual who ignore what God has blessed them with, and refuse to develop it, and then admire and spend their energy on reckless adventurism.

Please, women, don’t kill me. I always wonder why African women recently abandoned our very beautiful natural hair, that can be styled in different designs, to chase after artificial Caucasian styled hair and human hair of Brazilian, Indian, and other countries. Do you know how much women of African descent spend on hair every year? Do you know how much dark-skinned Africans spend on skin-whitening creams every year? Do you know the cost of healthcare from kidney diseases from the consequences of bleaching creams and soaps? Do you know how much Caucasians spend annually to stay outside in beaches just to get a tan?

5. Esau finished his game every time he returned from hunting.

He had no reserve and did not plan for the future. It was also possible that he would only go for hunting when his game is finished.

Do you know such people? They always have financial emergencies, from transport fares, money to discharge their wives that gave birth, to school fees. People beg money to bury very aged parents. Did you not know that a parent that is 95 years old is waiting for boarding and departure?

6. The spirit of Esau is reckless.

Esau sold his birthright for a meal and walked away without giving a hoot. Esau is a desperate and reckless negotiator.

Have you ever imagined how much of our national wealth as Africans are sold as peanuts to foreigners? Have come across people who sell their parents assets for immediate pleasures?

Most of the stolen wealth from our national treasuries are used to buy immediate pleasures and non-revenue-yielding liabilities overseas and locally. On which roads will a Nigerian drive a Rolls Royce phantom? Most of the monies that our young people make from internet fraud are spent on conspicuous consumption and primitive display of stupidity.

7. It’s the spirit of Esau that prevents many Africans from building enduring family businesses. Thank God Esau stopped hunting and settled down to build his own wealth.

8. Esau was a dirty fellow with body odour.

His dirty clothes were in his mother’s house. The father even testified to his bushman’s odour.

When you see dirty fellows and dirty environments, that’s the outward sign of the spirit of Esau; look around and everything about Esau will be present.

9. It was what Esau despised that was eventually processed to steal his blessings.

We export cocoa and buy processed chocolate with foreign exchange. We have refineries and crude oil, but we import refined products that gulp a large proportion of our national wealth.

10. Children who prefer to work for others instead of helping their parents build their family businesses are manifesting the spirit of Esau.

Check Lebanese, Indians, Jews, and several Asian families the build and expand their family businesses. There is no scarcity of opinions and excuses. Views are as abundant as air, but wisdom is scarce.

Esau learnt from pain and recovered, but his attitude is not God’s choice.

God Bless You.

1 Comment »

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