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The Preservative Power of Womanhood

In many packs of drugs, there is usually a small percentage of preservative that prolongs the shelf life of the drug. The same goes with some processed food materials.

1. The anatomy and physiology of a woman are designed for preservation and sustainability.

Her breast milk has all the nutrients and water a child needs for the first one year, including immunoglobulins for protection.

2. The softness of her body is very comforting to her children and equally to her husband.

Even David, in old age, needed the warmth of a woman to sustain him.

Men who have very good close relationships with their wives live long.

3. Sometimes, women bear a lot of pain and tolerate a lot of rubbish in marriage because of their children.

4. “Why should our father’s name get lost” mentality of Zelophehad’s daughters in the Bible is a natural instinct in females.

5. The chances of children raised by a widow surviving and excelling in life are much higher than those raised by a widower even if he is remarried.

The ability to rise up and face existential challenges is best elucidated by this true story.

In the early to mid-1970’s a woman lost her husband.

She was called to a family meeting to share her alongside her husband’s belongings, but she declined to be shared.

When she inquired about who will train her daughter, who was in secondary school, she was told that they don’t train females, and that if they did, it would be for the benefit of her husband in future. On further probing, the widow volunteered to pay the fees.

She was a petty trader selling cassava starch and kpokpo garri, a byproduct from starch production. From this petty trade, she was able to train her daughter through secondary school and school of nursing.

The daughter met a young doctor at 19 and they married 5 years later, when she was 24.

The doctor trained her through school of midwifery.

God blessed them eventually and the mother spent her old age and last days with her and the doctor.

The doctor gave the mother in-law good care.

She eventually died and had a great burial, never seen before in that community.

The in-law is building a beautiful school for his wife (her daughter) in her community.

That girl is my wife, Mrs. Felicia Apoki and that woman, Okunna Idogi, was my mother in-law.

I salute all parents, particularly mothers who stand up to train their children when society fails them. Particularly the girl child.

God bless widows and single mothers struggling to raise their children.

I celebrate the preservative power of womanhood.

God Bless You.

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